Resident Parking Permits need annual renewals

RESIDENTS SHOULD BE SURE THEIR RESIDENTIAL PARKING PERMIT IS RENEWED FOR 2021.

THE SCHENLEY FARMS NEIGHBORHOOD HAS RESTRICTED STREET PARKING. RESIDENTS ARE ASKED TO RENEW THEIR PERMITS EACH JANUARY. THERE ARE NO LONGER STICKERS FOR CARS, BUT THE LICENSE PLATE NUMBERS ARE USED TO CHECK.

OVER THE ‘PANDEMIC WINTER’, NEARBY SCHOOLS WERE UNOCCUPIED AND THERE WAS LITTLE ENFORCEMENT OF TICKETS FOR EXTENDED PARKING BY NON-PERMIT HOLDERS. HOWEVER, CITY PARKING OFFICIALS HAVE RECENTLY RETURNED. AND UN-PERMITTED CARS PARKED FOR GREATER THAN ONE HOUR ARE LIKELY TO RECEIVE PARKING TICKETS.


How to renew Resident Parking Permit:

Your Residential Parking Permit expires each January and in order to renew your permit, you need to follow these steps:
Log in to your account at: http://pittsburghrpp.com
Click ‘Renew My RPPs’
Upload required documents to prove your ID and residency (a signed lease or full page version of an electric, gas, or cable/internet bill). All permit holders must upload documents every year to renew their permits.
Upload vehicle registration(s)
Select your choice of permit
Submit for approval.
After you submit your renewal application, staff will review your files. You will receive email confirmation that your permit has been approved and the payment has been processed, or you will receive an email that your application has been rejected and instructions to upload new documents.

Thank you for parking with us!
The PPA Team

Crows in Pgh but not in Schenley Farms !!

Enjoy this clever “Bird Travel advertisement” , put together by interns of Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy and recorded Oct/Nov 2020.

Many thanks to a local bird expert Kate St. John, who helped so much in designing a crow relocation plan. She writes a daily blog about birds, which is interesting and fun!!

https://www.birdsoutsidemywindow.org/

SUCCESS – migrating crows ‘harassed’ away from SF trees

Every winter about 20 – 30 thousand migratory crows invade Pgh, seeking overnight roosting sites. For the past several years, the tall trees of SF streets has been a favorite of the visiting crows. This has caused considerable annoyance, especially the large amount of bird droppings on the ground as well as the raucous cawing in the evenings and early mornings. In 2019, a huge flock of crows arrived around mid-October and stayed until late January. Neighbors, especially along Bigelow Blvd but also near the Parkman wall, all have numerous tales of woe – scraping sidewalks, smelling the odiferous droppings, waking to socially-active boisterous birds preparing to leave for the day.

While crows are amazingly smart and interesting, and very important to the ecological systems, several neighbors decided that perhaps there were ways to encourage them to settle in places other than treasured residential trees. In Feb 2020, a first meeting was held, attending by Pgh City staff, District 8 Councilperson Erika Strassburger, representatives of USDA and members of Pitt and Oakland communities. A plan was prepared, with lots of input from bird-admiring wildlife experts. Our ultimate plan was dubbed CROW: Committee to Re-locate Our Wildlife. Components included distribution of wooden boards useful for clapping noises, pyrotechnic noise makers, small fireworks, and a variety of small efforts (dead bird effigies, lights on buildings; one neighbor spotted a hawk which may have also discouraged bird squatting).

The effort captains were Laura and Shirley, who created a text message blast list. About 18 families volunteered to make noise and sound in the early eveningtide as birds were seeking nighttime accommodation. Crows arrived into the city in the early weeks of November, and a coordinated effort was underway.

AND NOW WE ARE READY TO CLAIM SUCCESS!!!

Certainly crows have been around, and they fly overhead for short periods in the evening and morning. But none spend the nighttime here. Many organizations have collaborated and helped – U Pitt groundskeepers, UPMC (helicopter routes were unhindered), City of Pgh zone 4 police, City staff. What a great neighborhood effort !!! We will stay alert through December and January, but hope that the birds are happy in other quarters !!

Images:
board clappers used by Pitt groundkeepers
dead crow effigy on a rooftop (not visible from below)
Neighbor Norm sawing the board clappers given to neighbors

Wonderful bird blog discusses Migrating Crows into SF

Check this out. The author has been a great help in monitoring the influx of migrating crows. Here she discusses her observations. No-one knows exactly where the crows will land next.

Neighbors in SF admire and marvel at the attributes of crows, partly due to the education from bird-lovers like KSJ. However neighbors are still planning to “harass” these migrating crows, if they try to set up overnight lodging in the large neighborhood trees. We want to admire them from afar !!

Where Will The Crows Sleep This Winter?

St Agnes Church on Fifth: message from Preservation Pittsburgh

A number of people have expressed their concern regarding the former St. Agnes Church that Carlow University is planning to demolish as part of their 5th Avenue development.

Below are two actions which can be taken on behalf of the former St. Agnes Church:

#1) Petition to Save St. Agnes

Please sign:

http://chng.it/xCxtYsd7My

#2) Carlow is soliciting public comments as part of their Institutional Master Plan (IMP).

The IMP is required by the City of Pittsburgh. Carlow stated that they will be approaching the Planning Commission in November regarding the plan.

It is important that Carlow hears that people would like them to incorporate the existing St. Agnes Center (the former church) into their plans for their Lower Campus/5th Avenue Development. There is an adjacent parking lot and were they to build a taller building here, they likely could spare the church and use it as a historic and cultural anchor for their new development.

Here is the option to comment on the plan:
https://carlow.wufoo.com/forms/institutional-master-plan-feedback-form/

For more info on Carlow’s Institutional Master Plan (IMP)
https://www.carlow.edu/institutional_master_plan.aspx


Preservation Pittsburgh
1501 Reedsdale St., Suite 5003
Pittsburgh, Pa. 15233
www.preservationpgh.org

Halloween … how to ‘celebrate’ in pandemic times

The ongoing Covid-19 Pandemic is causing concern around the safety of typical usual Halloween practices. Sadly, this will affect this wonderful neighborhood, which is typically a joyful fun child-friendly place for trick-or-treaters.

Each neighbor is encouraged to consider the pluses and drawbacks of participation in Halloween events. The City of Pgh has issued some helpful guidelines, trying to preserve as much as possible this happy childhood event.

BASICS:

TRICK -R-TREAT EVENTS SHOULD BE HELP SAT 10/31 5 – 7 P.M.

SOME BASIC PUBLIC HEALTH REOMMENDATIONS SHOULD BE FOLLOWED TO MINIMIZE ANY RISKS — TO CHILDREN, THEIR CAREGIVERS, THE HOMEOWNERS!

For reference:

The city’s trick-or-treating hours will be 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 31.
The city urges the following precautions for trick-or-treating this year:
• Trick-or-treat only with family members.
• Wear cloth face masks as well as Halloween masks.
• Carry hand sanitizer.
• Distribute candy by leaving it outside (no in-person or face-to-face interactions at the door).
• Follow social distancing on sidewalks, and when approaching homes where others are getting candy.
• Do not attend indoor costume parties.
Mayor Bill Peduto says parents have expressed the need for Trick or Treating to on because so much as been taken away from children during the pandemic, “what parents were saying, they’ve asked that their children have this opportunity, over and over again. they felt that their kids have given up already, a lot.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that door-to-door trick-or-treating and costume masks and parties are discouraged this year due to the pandemic.

CROW = Coalition to Re-locate Our Wildlife (dis-inviting migrating crows to share our trees!)

The tall trees of Schenley Farms have been an increasing popular place for migrating crows to roost each winter. Crows seek light, warmth, and an area to socializing and sleep during the colder months. These birds are smart, fascinating, and important to the ecology of the region. However, they also create quite a nuisance …. with the noisy cacophony of cawing each evening and morning, and especially with the fecal droppings which land upon sidewalks, lawns, parked cars and houses. And the time period seems to be getting longer. Last year in 2019 crows were prominent nighttime residents in the trees from late October to early February.

This year an group of neighbors are hoping to ‘harass’ the birds, making the area less attractive to them. Tools of harassment are mainly NOISE and LIGHTS.

The effort is dubbed as CROW (Coalition to Re-locate Our Wildlife). Volunteers have been identified. But all persons living in the neighborhood are invited to participate Wooden clappers have been made and are available for distribution. Limited use of light/noises from minor fireworks will included. Flashes from cameras, and in some cases, holiday sparkle lights will be used also. It is anticipated that these noise/lights will be most effective around sunset, as the birds come from staging areas into the roosting areas for an overnight location. It is hoped that a few weeks of evening harassment effort will convince crows that there are better places to settle in.

HOPEFULLY NEIGHBORS WILL BE AWARE OF NOISE/LIGHT HARRASSMENT EFFORTS FOR A LIMITED TIME EACH EVENING. It could be a little annoying for some, but surely all SF neighbors dream of a Thanksgiving and Holiday period without Migrating Crows filling the trees each evening !!

Neighbors can have input into SCHENLEY PARK PLAN

Multiple changes for Schenley Park have been planned for over three years, including flood mitigation, trail expansion, road improvement. One of the more controversial aspects of the plan is for a proposed electric shuttle system that would run from Hazelwood through the park into Oakland.

A formal presentation will be made Wed 10/21/20 via Zoom and can be accessed at mon-oaklandmotility.com/virtual-meeting. There is still limited time for input from neighbors and others affected.

A Post-Gazette article explaining issues is available:

http://pge.libercus.net//.pf/showstory/202010180215/3

https://www.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/news/2020/10/19/new-oakland-to-hazelwood-shuttle-announced.html?ana=e_me_set3&j=90533771&t=Morning&mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTURsbU1UTmlZakJpWm1RNSIsInQiOiJkaGxmUTZHSkZKYXM5NVdTRFwvY2VDUlFBWGxkbnNUOUIxaWcxdmxHWlloRGJTRXZ4XC9OaTgzZzMrdklcL3AxczNqZ3A4MlZ1eDJQXC85ckJJXC9VK2hvT2U0SG9pcEF1MFJaODQxVStWZzludXJJbndXQnBmMjFlUWtZNXA2eWRjd0ZsIn0%3D

Reminder: Exploring Our Roots. Fun Educational event Oct 8

SFCA sponsors and annual history/architecture educational presentation each Autumn … in a series called “Exploring our Roots”.

It is here for 2020 … except we will be meeting virtually due to pandemic restrictions. Fortunately we have a exceptional speaker: Louise Sturgess who is a Fifth generation Pittsburger, and has been a prominent education presenter for PHLF for more than 30 years..

Details:

WHEN: Thursday, October 8, 2020 7:00 p.m.

WHERE:    The comfort of your own home – a ZOOM presentation (due to public health recommendations during Covid Pandemic)

WHO:  Speaker:  Louise Sturgess,   Education Advisor for Pittsburgh History and Landmark Foundation

Audience:    SFCA, SF neighbors, others interested in Pgh History

TOPIC: Big Gifts, Big Dreams: Oakland Civic Center

City developing a 10-year plan for OAKLAND, inviting input

https://engage.pittsburghpa.gov/oakland

Check out this link to learn more about the Oakland plan, and to get involved. Phase 1 input is being sought until Oct 18.

Neighborhood plans projects are sponsored by Dept of City Planning of Pittsburgh.

The Oakland Plan will create a 10-year plan with a shared vision for Oakland’s future and the projects and programs necessary to make that vision a reality.
Once adopted by the Planning Commission, the Oakland Plan will become City policy and guide public and private investments in the area. New land use regulations, transportation and infrastructure improvements, and public programs may also be recommended by the plan. The plan area generally includes the neighborhoods of North Oakland, Central Oakland, South Oakland, and West Oakland.